PETRI KULJUNTAUSTA & SAMI VAN INGEN:
DIAFONIA – A SYMPHONY FOR SLIDE PROJECTORS
Sun 17.4.2015 klo 21:30 WHS Teatteri Union, Unioninkatu 45 LH 1-2 Helsinki

In the orchestra every projector has their own sound and image, resulting DIAFONIA (32min). In the lobby of WHS Teatteri Union: Installation A# (2013). After the screening and the concert there will be 20 years celebration cake and party.

Petri Kuljuntausta (b. 1961) is a sonic artist, composer, and musician. In close collaboration with natural scientists, he has composed an underwater music and made music out of whale calls and the sounds of the northern lights. Environmental sounds, live-electronics, improvisation and collaborations with media artists have influenced him as a composer. Kuljuntausta has performed or collaborated with Morton Subotnick, Atau Tanaka, Richard Lerman, David Rothenberg, and Sami van Ingen, among others. Kuljuntausta has published three books on sound art and electronic music.

Sami van Ingen (b. 1964) is an Finnish experimental filmmaker and visual artist. Besides his practice as an artist van Ingen also curates film programs and is involved in film restoration and research. In his works van Ingen rigorously re-investigates existing film material and the apparatus that produces the illusionary spectacle of cinema, and thus he proposes new kinds of readings, aesthetics and utilization of cinema. Van Ingen´s book “Moving Shadows” was published in 2012.

 

KULJUNTAUSTA & VAN INGEN IN TANDEM

AAVE celebrates sonic artist, composer and musician Petri Kuljuntausta and experimental filmmaker Sami van Ingen’s 20 years time of collaborative works with a special program. Congratulations!

”In the audio-video work of Petri and Sami one cannot tell whether sound or image comes first because of their subtle and flowing intricate relationship. The sound seems to emerge from the image and the image from the sound creating a third fused audiovisual entity. Here the expression of both artists is sparse and minimal, addressing non-development from different angles at the same time as displaying an extended linearity.” (Phill Niblock and Katherine Liberovskaya)


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