ANKA & WILHELM SASNAL: PARASITE
Huba / 2013 / 66min / 35mm
Sat 16.4.2016 klo 15:00 Malmitalo, Ala-Malmin tori 1 Helsinki

Parasite is a film about an ailing old man and a young mother. After retiring from the factory, the man, deprived of his daily routine, loses control over his time. Unable to eat or sleep, he starts drying up. The mother and child are like a single organism. Yet their relationship is, for all its closeness, one of dependence and inequality. The child, whose attachment to life is the strongest, is ravenous and needy; the woman, though enjoying a brief moment of freedom, is doomed to be a victim. When the three of them try to have a life together, they are like the Holy Family reversed. Brought together by chance, their lives intertwine in a web of oppression. The film follows their daily existence and slow decline.

Wilhelm Sasnal (b. 1972) is a painter and filmmaker and lives and works in Kraków. He studied architecture at the Krakow University of Technology, and painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow.

Anka Sasnal (b. 1973) studied Polish literature at the Pedagogical University of Kraków and gender studies at Jagiellonian University (Uniwersytet Jagielloński) in Kraków. Anka Sasnal is an editor, screenwriter and filmmaker and she lives and works in Kraków.

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KROKI – POLISH STEPS

The Polish word ”kroki” means steps. It is also the Finnish word for ”croquis”, meaning rapid drawings of a living model, often made in a series. In Kroki we celebrate the rich history and present day of Polish cinema with three masterpieces. The works have a common theme in the circumstances of life. Andrzej Żuławski´s The Third Part of the Night (Trzecia cześć nocy, 1971) opens up a desperate surreal view on the events of the II World War. Wilhelm and Anka Sasnal´s Parasite (Huba, 2013) tells a tale of three people whose existence is all about domination, dependence and survival. The Performer (2015) is a film about the performance artist Oskar Dawicki, whose career is based on the doubting and questioning the essence of his own identity.


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